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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
the past 50 years. today america has its first black president. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >> and african americans do routinely hold top posts like secretary of state, attorney general, national security advisor. top corporations like merck, american express, mcdonald's and xerox have had or have now black ceo's. oprah winfrey is america's second black billionaire, following in the footsteps of publishing mogul robert l johnson. african americans are among the country's top sports stars and celebrities in fields one restricted by racing, swelling the ranks of black millionaires. yet in other ways america is far from king's dream. racial divides persist in income, educational achievement, and poverty. question, are we less conscious of race today than in 1963, more conscious of race today, or are things about the same? pat buchanan. >> i think we're probably more conscious right now, john, but i was at the march on washington. i was up there in the lincoln memorial when dr. king gave that address. and it was a moment really when the cresting of the civil rights movement,
electricity to gas to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> myth number 5, our drinking water is in danger was r because oil companies frack. frack? what's that? >> end fracking now. >> the controversy is over chemicals being injected into the earth to break up rock and release natural gas. >> fracking means shoving water and chemicals into the ground, fracturing the rock to release oil and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but recently, geologists learned how to drill sideways. result? america now has much more and, therefore, cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon, america may be self sufficient in energy. also, if you're worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> fracking feels wrong. it feels like you're pumping stuff into mother earth. but it's an amazing story. >> a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
an all latino comedian panel covering immigration, and issues. and two weeks, al jazeera america takes over current tv. but tonight's f-bomb deals with the outrageous racism. and this is the birthday of patrick ewing, and the late great adam of the beasty boys who would have been 49 years old today. 47 years ago today the beatles released revolver, the greatest album of all time, and a young ronald reagan once said where free unions and collective bargaining is lost, we lose the middle class. this is "viewpoint." [♪ theme music ] >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fugelsang this is "viewpoint." the latest case of minimum rage spilled out into the streets. thousands of fast-food workers walked off of the job. they want the right to unionize, and for the federal minimum wage to double from $7.25 an hour, to $15 an hour, and i call that a pretty good start. the image of a fast-food working has long been painted as a teenager. but the average age of a male employee is 29, and 32 for females. more than 25% of fast-food employees are the heads of their households. mcdonald's posted r
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
, everybody, i'm martha maccallum here in "america's newsroom." what a story this is. gregg: incredible courage. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. listen to the hero of this story. her name is antoinette toff. she came face-to-face with the shooting suspect, michael brand done hill. >> oh i'm in the front office. he went outside to start shooting. [gunfire] can i run? >> can you get somewhere safe? >> yeah. i got to go. and he's coming back. >> put the phone down. >> okay. she said she is getting police to tell him to back off for you, okay? >> tell them to stop all movement. >> okay. okay. >> stop all movement now on the ground. stop all movement on the ground. he said don't care if he die. he have nothing to live for. he says he is not mentally stable. >> stay on the line with me. okay? put the phone down if you have to but don't put it on hold so i can't hear. martha: she not only calms him down but then she speaks to the police and becomes a intermediary in this situation. she convinces him to give himself up before hurting anybody. listen to this part. >> let me talk to them an
the baseballs, there might be no financial crisis. >>> meanwhile, somewhere in america, a deranged woman you probably worked with is now writing her first love letter to ariel castro in prison despite the fact he slut shamed his victims during sentence. we'll uncover the slut shaming from rush limbaugh to castro on tonight's f bomb. today is the birthday of the late jerry garcia, also the birthday of my favorite rapper, public enemy leader chuck d and coolio is 50. how did that happen? i mention the musical artists today because mtv has a birthday they launched on this date in 1981 when the letters in their logo stood for music television. they dropped the words music television in 2010 proving once and for all that mtv now stands for nothing. this is "viewpoint." >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fuglesang. this is "viewpoint." white house officials and democrats in both houses screamed from the rooftops about how bad sequestration would be. after the g.o.p. rammed it through both houses and john boehner boasted he got 98% of what he wanted, republicans said and i'm paraphrasing here
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
attended the u.s. army war college in pin in pennsylvania. there are security issues where the america needs cooperation. the security and the u.s. warships routinely transit an. each day in egypt fuel the call to cutoff aid. the detention of sti of spiritul leader brought this from the white house. >> that's not in line of the standard to uphold in respect to human rights. >> the relationship we skwreupt is deep. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to th
>>> making news in america this morning, tensions rise today. teams poised to probe a suspected chemical attack in syria as washington moves one step closer to military action. we are live with the latest. >>> growing concerns. a raging wildfire shows no signs of slowing down this california, and it could soon start affecting the water supply of an entire city. >>> hit-and-run on the racetrack. a driver takes out the pit crew costing him the race. who is really to blame? >>> the reunion, the performances and the outfits. we have the good, the bad and the ugly, the very ugly, on the mtv video music awards. ♪ >>> good morning, everyone. we begin with the mounting crisis in syria pushing the u.s. one step closer to military action. >> as the u.n. weapons inspections team today heads to the site of an apparent chemical weapons attack, last week the u.s. was considering its military options. abc's devin dwyer has the very, and he has latest from washington. >> reporter: good morning, diana and john. that's right, u.s. officials are in the midst of urgent consultations over syria. t
, the official clown reaction. judy quest, the president of the clowns of america and contributor to clowns journal, a real clown wouldn't mock obama. >> jim ? >> i grew up in college towns in the '60s, '70s, there wasn't an anti-nixon ral wily that didn't have a nixon mask. surprisingly the aclu hasn't gotten involved. >> there is a racist look, the guy saying, charge the obama clown, and the crowd applauding. that does not belong at a places where children are going, a rodeo basically. totally inappropriate. >> go ahead, rick. >> alan, have you ever seen the mask of george bush? >> so the argument is the other side does it, too. >> come on, liberals need to understand humor in america. >> it wasn't humor. it was racism and totally inappropriate to teach children that's how you deal with the office of the presidency. >> i heard you. let me finish. the simple fact is that this week the freak-out from the left to be totally intolerant of humor is ridiculous. why don't you turn on jon stewart one night during the bush presidency and then come talk to me. >> sensitivity training for all clowns
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
and the administration is absolutely right when they say they want and america wants inclusive tolerant institutions in egypt. the question is, how do build them, and we -- the way to build them is not to burn them down. that's why i think we should retain our strong rlelationship with the military. not because we condone it or agree with it, it's the only power in town. if we going rebuild egypts institution, it's better to rebuild from within than burn them down and start from scratch. simply put, the big state is better than no state. that's the only choice facing us nous. >> countries at odds with each other. israel and the non-secular people, the black costuming people, who really want a religious state's in people in northern ireland who want to be forever a part of britain and others who very much want to be a republic of ireland. here are here want sharia led, real islamic law, political power and other people who are just egyptians who want to live the way egyptians have lived for thousands of years. can they be co-habitating? is in a model for them to cohabitate that country? >> that's a q
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. that's the headlines "consider this" is up next on al jazeera. ♪ ♪ >>> measles outbreak in texas has been linked to a so-called mega church where ministers have questioned the use of vaccinations. at least 21 people from the illness. health officials and the church itself are trying to contain the outbreak by hosting vaccination clinics. doctors say a visitor to the church who was infected with measles likely spread it to the population at the community church. >>> it's a bit like having a snow day off, but across the midwest, it's heat not wintery weather that is closing schools. the sweltering temperatures have closed schools. those who
in our nations capital under the shadow of the great emancipator to awaken america's long slumber conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day. how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose names never appeared in the history books. never got on tv. many have gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry. soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten. and children fire hosed. and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred they prayed for their tormentors. in the face of violence they sto
to the credibility and the future interests of the united states of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. it is directly related to our credibility and whether countries still believe the united states, when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they, too, can put the world at greater risk. and make no mistake, in an increasingly complex world of sectarian and religious extremist violence what, we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things, but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murder er like bashar assd can gas thousands of his own people with impunity, even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it, there will be no end to the tested of our resolve and the dangers that w
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
on the studio on the upper west side. no longer there. only played at one theatre in america for two weeks. and there were lines around the block. >> john: i was at nyu back when that came out. back in the '80s, you and jim were all we were allowed to talk about. >> what it tells me about "from she's gonna have it," 27 years ago today until presently, somehow, of all of the films i've done, all over those three decades, it moved people. it has to. if someone is giving you their last $5, you did a movie. you did something. that connected them. and they never forgot it. >> john: that's the power of the media. for me, that's what film making is about. telling stories. >> john: you have an artistic professor of nyu's graduate film program for over ten years now. >> 15 teaching and five as artistic director. >> john: how did that lead you to getting into kick starter? >> well, i teach one day a week. 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. people sign up on my door for half an hour. i have lunch from 1:00 to 2:00. we have class from 2:00 to 5:00. and only teach third year director students. many of my students
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
is give an alternative. we need to start telling the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he las to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like john brabender, carl row
jazeera america. good evening. newt gingrich today came out and said the republican party has to be less vicious and negative. newt gingrich called other republicans vicious and negative, and somewhere, an angel coughed up blood. also, rick perry is going to run for president again, the man who thought arab spring was a saudi death rant. i'll give a list of every democratic that demanded to see the birth certificate. >> 48 years ago tonight, the balesles in vented legendary rock at shea stadium. 44 years ago, the woodstock music festival opened and tonight, we present to you the final hour of original programming produced for current t.v. it has been my privilege to host this show. this evening, we say goodbye with roseanne barr, lewis black, heroic activate and new town survivor erika laughty. i am john fugelsang, this is and has been viewpoint. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ theme >> sit down. sit down! good evening, i'm john fugelsang, this is viewpoint. on this show, i get to say what i want to say, and how i want to say it. that is rare in t.v. i thank current and the guys at al jazeer
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
a political perspective, america does not want to touch the kind of mess in the middle east. theink that is just political context and reality of this. you asked whether any of us have regrets. regarding our support for democracy in the muslim brotherhood. let me be very clear. i know you know this. the three people sitting up here today have each been very clear eyed and very critical of what we saw as actions by the muslim brotherhood and president morsi that were undermining democratic prospects in egypt. president morsi issued a decree that set him above judicial review. he ran through a constitution that was asked visionary -- was exclusionary. were pushing ay law that would have eviscerated the judiciary. it would have clamped down public protests. civilld have nationalized society organizations in the country. i don't think any of us had any illusions about the trajectory that he was on and we all voice to those concerns. think, to no way i say that i am easily relaxed about the outcome in egypt. i think what happened on july 3 has sent a country further down the path toward
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
of the egyptians. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it is tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> joining me today, political editor and white house correspondent at "the huffington post," sam stein. "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, founder and editor at large, charlie senate, jon meacham author of "thomas jefferson -- the art of power." joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman muhyeldin. we're hearing from the spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood that they want to remain nonviolent and peaceful. we are also at the same time hearing news that there is live ammo being launched by morsi supporters and molotov cocktails. can you give us the latest on the situation on th
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
. america live starts right now. >> starting with the fox news alert. a big opening blast on what is described as the potential coming war over who gets to vote. welcome everybody to america live and so there are debates breaking out over how our elections should be held and what rules will be in place when it comes to voting. the issue erupted after the supreme court went down and that gave a bit more power to set their own rules on these things and that ruling sparked protest and drew sharp criticism from the justice department and former secretary of state addressed the issue at an event that many will be a 2016 presidential run for her. >> we have seen a sweeping effort in our country to obstruct new obstacles to voting. under cover and addressing election fraud. in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights are introduced in 31 states. not every obstacle is to race. but those who say racial is not a problem in the election must not be paying attention. >> that is from hillary clinton. >> our host of power play. chris. chris, is this the makings of a battle tha
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